See What They Say
I was extremely impressed with the quality of the artwork, you can really see the details of the han...
by wonofy AtiTEXT_OF_5_STARS
not installed yet, but love them! perhaps framed will show better???
by Boyangd sonTEXT_OF_5_STARS
Like these, the feeling was so cool on the wall. nice perfect..
by Quanah ClancyTEXT_OF_5_STARS
I received these in the mail the other day, they are beautiful so much detail went into them. I woul...
by Elionor TateTEXT_OF_5_STARS
Le tableau est plus beau que je le croyait , ca vaut le coup , colis est bien soigner et envoi rapid...
by Gerda WicksTEXT_OF_5_STARS

Masks of Beijing Opera


Gold and silver colors are usually used for gods and spirits. The main color in a facial makeup symbolizes the disposition of the character. The facial makeups date a long time back to the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) dynasties at least. Simple patterns of painted faces are found in tomb murals of that age. During the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), improvements were made in the skills of drawing and in preparing the paints, leading to the whole set of colorful facial patterns that we see in today's Jingju (Beijing Opera).


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