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Got what I ordered. These fit nicely over my bed. They need to explain a little about the hangers th...
by Kelly TiegerTEXT_OF_5_STARS
The painting arrived very well packed. On unpacking we were very pleased with the quality of the rep...
by Sheila WilliamsTEXT_OF_5_STARS
Excellent work and beautiful pictures.
Compliments to the package and the speed with which they cam...
by Ruby TuckerTEXT_OF_5_STARS
Great painting,
I compared with photo of the original, it is very good this it copies, perfect.
by Ermalene VeraTEXT_OF_5_STARS
I just had this delivered to my house. It's nice to not have to pay much money for a quality piece.
by Dillon CarmelTEXT_OF_5_STARS

Masks of Beijing Opera


Gold and silver colors are usually used for gods and spirits. The main color in a facial makeup symbolizes the disposition of the character. The facial makeups date a long time back to the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) dynasties at least. Simple patterns of painted faces are found in tomb murals of that age. During the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), improvements were made in the skills of drawing and in preparing the paints, leading to the whole set of colorful facial patterns that we see in today's Jingju (Beijing Opera).


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